Essential Albums: Boards Of Canada- Music Has the Right to Children

Quick Band Bio: Boards of Canada is the moniker for two Scottish brothers, Michael Sandison and Marcus Eoin, and it serves as a project for them to experiment with electronic music. Their discography is a confusing mix of official and unofficial albums, cassettes, and EPs, with the earliest known release being a cassette recording of Catalog 3 in 1987. Music Has The Right To Children was released 11 years later in 1998, and features samples from numerous sources of inspiration to the band, including The National Film Board of Canada which inspired the band’s name.

Music Has the Right to Children is very different from the other albums mentioned in this topic so far because of the genre difference alone. To classify it as electronic is a bit scary because my target audience for this article will read that and dismiss the album as outside of their tastes, but alternative rock kids will find fascinating experimental sounds with psychedelic and ambient qualities displaying themselves. It’s smooth electronic music that would work perfectly well as background music and even better if you decided to analyze it for every reference the duo creates.
Continue reading Essential Albums: Boards Of Canada- Music Has the Right to Children

Oberhofer- Notalgia EP

One of the best parts of being involved with the radio station is that you get exposure to bands that you wouldn’t have heard about before. The best example of this is Oberhofer, a band from Brooklyn who released their debut album Time Capsules II last March and quickly became a favorite at our station and on the CMJ charts. Back when it arrived at CDB I remember choosing to review it based upon the marketing label on the front that described it as indie pop and listed the major festivals they were booked to perform at, and within a calendar year they would be performing in Albany for both Pearl Palooza and as the second headliner for our station’s 35th birthday anniversary.

Time Capsules II was instantly accessible and consistent, and I wrote about it on this blog naming it my favorite album that came out last March and my 5th favorite album of last year. Still there were some complaints that I’d routinely make about the band’s style despite loving the album, which is well summed up by my quote in the second link of how “Oberhofer has to find a way to keep the pop sensibility without whistling, playing the xylophone, and singing “oooo”‘s in every song; they have to progress to more meaningful songs”. And that’s where the Notalgia EP comes in to play.

Continue reading Oberhofer- Notalgia EP